Thoughts on Gluten Cross Reactive Foods

After coming across many blogs talking about “19 gluten cross reactive foods” I was first concerned and worried, then overwhelmed by the sheer number of foods that may be problematic.

Then I found another busting the “myth” (Christina Graves), doing a better job of it than I ever could, and clearing up the confusion. This also prompted me to finally read at least the abstract and conclusion of the original study (Aristo Vojdani, Igal Tarash Cross-Reaction between Gliadin and Different Food and Tissue Antigens, Food and Nutrition Sciences, Vol.4 No.1, January 2013). The 19 foods were the initial suspects, so to speak, but among them only milk, corn, rice, and also millet and yeast (but these possibly due to cross contamination) were found to possibly cause issues. Also the study was done for cross reactivity with α-gliadin, relevant for celiac disease.

Had I gone to the source from the beginning, I would have known that this probably doesn’t apply to me to begin with. As far as I know I am not celiac. I am most likely reacting to ω-gliadin (based on the fact that my symptoms are exacerbated by exercise), another component of gluten. And those are not the only two parts that make up the structure of gluten! NCGS (non-celiac gluten sensitivity) might involve other parts.

Along with gluten, I too have problems with milk (confirmed allergy) and fresh yeast. Does it mean anything that it partially matches the study’s results?
Among the 19 suspects, I have problems with quinoa, buckwheat (confirmed allergy), and amaranth.
But are these cross reactions to gluten? More likely they are separate problems of their own or cross reactions to my other allergies.

As I too started my food journey by going gluten free, it was all too easy to think that I was either being “glutened” or was having gluten cross reactions when I continued to have symptoms. At least for me, the answer turned out to be additional allergies and sensitivities apart from gluten. This is also mentioned in the original study’s conclusion.

“If after adherence to a strict gluten-free diet and the elimination of cross-reactive foods symptoms still persist, further investigation for other food intolerances should follow.”

Yet again, cross reactivity is a complicated issue, at the molecular level. While it can  indicates increased possibility, it may or may not apply to you. Depends on how your immune system identifies the “offenders” and how accurate it is. So, individual answers may all be different.

Following such lists can be misleading, inconvenient, possibly dangerous without first testing yourself.

Regarding testing, along with formal skin tests, blood tests, or even endoscopies, carefully done elimination diets, food challenges, and possibly data tracking and molecular structure simulations might help find answers.

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